FAQ

What does the Wharton Energy Club do?
What Energy classes does Wharton offer?
How does Wharton compare to other business schools?
How does the Wharton Energy Club compare to other energy clubs?
Is there an energy major at Wharton?
What energy companies recruit at Wharton?
I don’t have an energy background; can I still get a job in energy after business school?
I have an energy background and want to stay in the industry. How does joining the Wharton Energy Club help me?
I’m an alumni and I would like to speak to the club, who should I contact?
Who can attend the Wharton Energy Conference? Where do I learn more?
Can I ask someone in the Energy Club to review my essays for school?
If I speak to someone in the Energy Club, is it okay to quote them in my applications/essays?
Can I attend the Wharton Energy Conference if I am not a student?
Is there someone I can speak to in the Energy Club while visiting campus?
When can I join the Wharton Energy Club?
How do I join the Wharton Energy Club?
What events does the Wharton Energy Club hold?
If I have a specific question, who do I contact?

What does the Energy Club do?
The Wharton Energy Club is a student-run professional club at Wharton. The Energy Club serves the diverse needs and interests of its members who are either i) pursuing careers within the energy industry, ii) pursuing careers within related industries (e.g. finance, consulting, banking) or iii) simply interested in learning about energy issues. The club holds educational workshops, hosts industry professional speakers, organizes student led treks to both domestic and international cities (e.g. San Francisco, Houston, New York, Boston, London), participates in energy business competitions, plans the annual Wharton Energy Conference, organizes student led studies and brings energy industry employers and students together.

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What Energy classes does Wharton offer?
The Wharton business school offers two energy classes (BEPP 762-Energy Markets and FNCE 882-Energy Finance) and two environmental classes (OPIM 761-Environmental Management and OPIM 762-Environmental Sustainability). There are also ample opportunities to become involved in energy specific independent studies and field application projects that are for credit. The school allows up to two credits of non-Wharton courses to count toward graduation and there are many classes offered by University of Pennsylvania schools you can take in energy. Following is a listing of Wharton and Penn energy classes: (Note: classes are subject to change based on faculty availability)

  1. BEPP 762-Energy Markets & Policy
    Faculty Contact: Arthur van Benthem
    The objective of this course is to provide students with the economist’s perspective on a broad range of issues that professionals in the energy industry will encounter. The focus will be on business and public policy issues related to the recent changes in energy markets. Topics include the effect of competition, market power and scarcity on energy prices, the impact of deregulation on fossil fuel and electricity markets, extraction and pricing of oil and gas, the environmental impact and policies related to the energy sector, environmental cap-and-trade markets, the economics of renewable energy, energy efficiency, and recent developments in the transportation sector.
  2. FNCE 882 – Energy Finance (ASP-Advanced Study Project)
    Faculty Contact: Erik Gilje
    The objective of this course is to provide students with detailed knowledge of corporate structures, valuation methods, project finance, risk management practices, corporate governance issues, and geo-political risks in the energy industry. In general, this course seeks to provide students with an overall context for understanding energy issues and risks, and how these might affect financing and investment decisions for both providers of energy and end-users of energy.
  3. OPIM 761 – Risk Analysis and Environmental Management
    This course is designed to introduce students to the role of risk assessment, risk perception and risk management in dealing with uncertain health, safety and environmental risks including the threat of terrorism. It explores the role of decision analysis as well as the use of scenarios for dealing with these problems. The course will evaluate the role of policy tools such as risk communication, economic incentives, insurance, regulation and private-public partnerships in developing strategies for managing these risks. A project will enable students to apply the concepts discussed in the course to a concrete problem. Cross-listed with BEPP 761.
  4. OPIM 762 – Environmental Sustainability and Value Creation
    Faculty Contact: Erwann Michel-Kerjan
    This course approaches environmental issues and sustainable development more largely, from the standpoint of business. It emphasizes the trends in corporate practices and uses case studies to examine the interactions between the environment and the firm. Value creation focuses on new innovative services and financial products in this fast growing sphere. This course has three objectives: to increase your knowledge as future top decision makers on key environmental questions; to recognize environmental concerns as competitive opportunities; to teach students to think strategically and act entrepreneurially on environmental issues. You will leave the class with a tool-kit for action.

Penn Graduate Classes:

  1. Engineering & Applied Science (EAS) 501 – Energy and its Impacts: Technology, Ecology, Economics, and Sustainability

    The objective is to introduce students to one of the most dominating and compelling areas of human existence and endeavor: energy, with its foundations in technology, association to economics, and impacts on ecology and society. This introduction is intended both for general education and awareness and for preparation for careers related to this field. The course spans from basic principles to applications. A review of energy consumption, use, and resources; ecological impacts, sustainability and design of sustainable energy systems; methods of energy analysis; forecasting; electricity generation systems (steam and gas turbine based power plants, fuel cells), energy for transportation (cars, aircraft, and ships); nuclear energy and wastes; renewable energy use: solar, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, biomass; prospects for future energy systems: fusion power, power generation in space.
  2. EAS 502 – Renewable Energy and Its Impacts

    The objective is to introduce students to the major aspects of renewable energy, with its foundations in technology, association to economics, and impacts on ecology and society. This introduction is intended both for general education and awareness and for preparation for careers related to this field. The course spans from basic principles to applications. A review of solar, wind, biomass, hydroelectric, geothermal energy, and prospects for future energy systems such as renewable power generation in space.
  3. EAS 503 – Energy Systems and Policy
    This is a survey course that will examine the current U.S. energy industry, from production to consumption, and its impacts on local, regional, and the global environment. The course will seek to provide a fuller understanding of existing energy systems, ranging from technical overviews of each, a review of industry organization, and an exploration of the well-established policy framework each operates within. Near-term demands upon each energy supply system will be discussed, with particular focus on environmental constraints.
  4. EAS 505 – Climate Policy and Technology
    The course will exam Pacala and Socolow’s hypothesis that “Humanity already possesses the fundamental scientific, technical and industrial know-how t solve the carbon and climate problem for the next half-century.” Fifteen “climate stabilization wedges” i.e., strategies that each have the potential to reduce carbon emissions by 1 billion ons per year by 2054, will be examined in detail. Technology and economics will be reviewed. Socio-political barriers to mass-scale implementation will be discussed.
  5. EAS 506 – Electricity and Systems Markets
    The course discusses the existing electricity system from technical, economic, and policy perspectives. Basic power system engineering will be reviewed early in the course. Generation, transmission, distribution, and end-use technologies and economics will be discussed. Additional topics will include system operation, industry organization, government regulation, the evolution of power markets, environmental policy, and emerging technologies.
  6. MEAM 502 – Energy Engineering
    Quantitative introduction to the broad area of energy engineering, from basic principles to applications. The focus is on the science and engineering of power generation. The course includes a review of energy resources and consumption, power cycles, combined cycles, and co-generation, nuclear energy and wastes, solar thermal and photovoltaic energy, and wind power. Additional energy conversion topics including energy storage and geothermal, thermoelectric, hydroelectric and biomass power will be briefly discussed. Prerequisite(s) MEAM 203 or equivalent, and MEAM 333 (Heat and Mass Transfer, Thermodynamics).

Additionally, if you are interested in Environmental Impact of Energy and Water, review Environmental Science’s offerings here.

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How does Wharton compare to other business schools?
Unfortunately, this is a question you will have to answer through your own research. While we are happy to discuss our experiences at Wharton, we do not feel qualified to compare Wharton to business schools that we have not attended.

How does the Wharton Energy Club compare to energy clubs at other business schools?
We do not feel qualified to make this comparison, but are happy to discuss our experiences with the Wharton Energy Club.

Is there an Energy major at Wharton?
Wharton does not have an Energy-specific major; however there is an option to tailor your classes to create your own major. Energy club members commonly have a broader major and concentrate in Energy by i) taking Energy courses offered by University of Pennsylvania schools and ii) participating in energy specific independent studies and field application projects.

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What energy companies recruit at Wharton?
Many energy companies recruit at Wharton via formal and informal recruiting. Past energy companies have included: Exelon, Exxon, Chevron, Sempra, AES, as well as a number of energy focused private equity firms and start-ups. Wharton also has a large alumni network working in the energy industry.

I don’t have an energy background. Can I still get a job in energy after business school?
Absolutely, many of the energy club members come from a non-energy background and are able to find internships and jobs in the industry after graduation.

I have an energy background and want to stay in the industry. How does joining the energy club at Wharton help me?
If you have an energy background, joining the energy club connects you to a network of people with similar interests. Through the club, you can continue your industry education, stay current with industry trends, make contacts for potential job opportunities, enter energy competitions and form groups to analyze a specific energy interest via an independent study. Some students have even started businesses with fellow club members.

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I’m an alumni and I would like to speak to the club, who should I contact?
Please contact one of the following people:
Raphael Speck, VP of education, rspeck@wharton.upenn.edu
Amanda Peterson, Co-President of the Energy Club, pamanda@wharton.upenn.edu
Jordan Roberts, Co-President of the Energy Club, jroberts@wharton.upenn.edu

Who can attend the Wharton Energy Conference? Where do I learn more?
The annual Wharton Energy Conference is open to the public. Anyone can attend. We had a very successful conference this year. To learn more, go to: http://www.whartonenergyclub.com/wec2009/
Continue to check the Wharton Energy Club website for information on next year’s conference.

Can I attend the Wharton Energy Conference if I am not a student?
Absolutely! Tickets can be purchased through the conference website in advance of the conference.

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Can I ask someone in the Energy Club to review my essays for school?
Unfortunately, it is inappropriate to ask Energy Club members to review application essays.

If I speak to someone in the Energy Club, is it okay to quote them in my applications/essays?
It is okay to quote Energy Club members in applications/essays as long as that person gives his or her consent.

Is there someone I can speak to in the Energy Club while visiting campus?
The Energy Club leadership accommodates as many speaking/meeting requests from prospective students as is possible. The ability to meet a specific request depends on availability. Feel free to contact any of the Energy Club board members to request a meeting.

When can I join then Energy Club?
Energy Club membership is first available during the first quarter of a student’s first term at Wharton. Membership is not available prior to your enrollment at Wharton.

How do I join the Energy Club?
Energy Club membership is available through the Wharton Graduate Association’s website.

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What events does the energy club hold?
The Energy Club holds a variety of events including:
• Education sessions regarding industries, careers, functional skills, science and technology.
• Career treks to meet with employers in cities throughout the United States.
• Speaker engagements with a variety of leaders from the energy industry as well as from related industries.
• Field Trips to regional companies and other private and public entities.
• The Wharton Energy Conference.
• Networking events with club members, other Wharton clubs, other University of Pennsylvania schools and outside organizations.
• Social Events – we like to have a good time!

If I have a specific question, who do I contact?
Please reach out to the board member most appropriate for your question. Board members are also happy to put you in touch with other members, if he/she is unable to answer a question.

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Sponsors: Husky Energy